River Classification

Rafting is the type of sport that consists allowing oneself to go with the current of a whitewater river raft directed from the by a guide. The participants aboard the raft sit on the sides where they help the guide direct the raft by paddling. The size of the boat depends on the size of the river, and in the Baker River we use 16-foot rafts that can carry up to 12 paddlers.

Class VI (Extrem)

For experts only.

Class V (Expert)

Extremely large waves with obstructions that expose the boater to high risk. One as well must be very educated on the river, boating and should be in excellent physical condition. Exploration is necessary the first time and requires one must be in excellent physical shape with experience. Swimming is a danger and rescue is very difficult even for experts.

Class III (Intermediate)

Rapids with moderate, irregular waves with complex maneuvers. Rapid currents and precise control of the raft is necessary. There are big waves and strainers, which are easy to avoid. Previous exploration is recommended for someone not knowing the river or a les experienced boater. It is rare that one swim y rescue is easy but can require the assistance of the group.

Class IV (Advanced)

Intense rapids that are powerful but predictable and require precise navigation. Depending on the characteristics of the river, there can be large waves and unavoidable holes and require rapid response and maneuvers. Exploration is necessary the first time and requires one must be in excellent physical shape with experience. Swimming is a danger and rescue is very difficult even for experts.

Class II (Beginners)

Direct rapids with wide, clear channels that make it unnecessary to explore them beforehand.

Class I (Easy)

Fast Current with rolling water and small waves. Very few obstructions. The risk for swimming is low and self-rescue is easy.